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Mission Statement

Above all, we value our customer relationships and the Pest Control is committed to providing each customer with quality service and total customer satisfaction.

Our mission as a pest control company is to promote our role as the protectors of food, health, property and the environment by using technical knowledge and communication.

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bees & wasps control

removing bees & behives requires an expert to do it... call us today!

 

Test our expertise when it comes to identifying bee and wasp problem. Removing bees and bee hives are one of our expertise. With rising concerns of the Africanized bee (killer bee) more people are now looking to control their bee problems rather than avoiding them.
Bees are robust-bodied and very hairy compared with wasps. Their hind legs are flattened for collecting and transporting pollen. Bees are important pollinators.

Wasps have a slender body with a narrow waist, slender, cylindrical legs, and appear smoothed-skinned and shiny. Yellow jackets, boldfaced hornets, and paper wasps are the most common types of wasps encountered by people.

Wasps and bumble bees have annual colonies that last for only one year. The colony dies in the fall with only the newly produced queens surviving the winter. The new queens leave their nests during late summer and mate with males. The queens then seek out overwintering sites, such as under loose bark, in rotted logs, under siding or tile, and in other small crevices and spaces, where they become dormant. These queens become active the following spring when temperatures warm. They search for favorable nesting sites to construct new nests. They do not reuse old nests.

Honey bees are perennial insects with colonies that survive more than one year. Honey bees form a cluster when hive temperatures approach 57° F. As the temperature drops, the cluster of bees becomes more compact. Bees inside this mass consume honey and generate heat so that those in the cluster do not freeze. As long as honey is available in the cluster, a strong colony can withstand temperatures down to -30° F. or lower for extended periods.